13 ways to increase your customers spending

Use words that suggest small amounts
‘Low maintenance’ for example is more appealing to a customer than ‘high performance’ .

Odd pricing
Prices that end in an odd number for example $15.97 are more appealing to customers. Compared to a number ending in an even value or as a whole number, such as $15.98 or $16.

Reduce whole number prices by $0.01
When skimming over a price, most subconsciously perceive a price as cheaper than the whole amount. $5.99 feels cheaper than $6.

Remove the comma
In prices of over $1000 research has shown removing the commas (such as in $1,000) make s a price appear lower to a customer.

Choose prices with fewer syllables
Shorter sounding prices are often considered lower values when repeating a price in our head.

If possible, remove the dollar sign
Studies with restaurant menus with and without a dollar sign in front of the price, saw customers spend more when there was no dollar sign present.

Create visual contrast between a sale and presale price
When presenting a sale price next to the original price, make the sale price smaller and a lower font-weight than the original price. This emphasises its sale potential.

Maximize the figure of a discount size
When discounting a product, present whatever value is larger compared to the percentage off or the dollar amount. For example, 25% off a $20 item is better than saying $5 off.

Stagger discounts
Reduce discounts over time and show the customer discounts they missed out on. This will cause the customer to make an on-the-spot purchase decision so as not to miss out on further decline of the sale. For example, Day 1: 30% off Day 2: 20% off, Day 3: 10% off, and so on.

Create a sense of urgency
following on from the above tip. Creating a reason for the customer to make an urgent purchase will increase conversions. Such methods include, display a limited stock indicator, a counter of how many people have the product in their cart, limited-time offer notifications.

Prices in Red
This one applies to men, studies show that men are more likely to make a purchasing decision if the price is displayed in red text. Red typically signifies a discounted price.

Include an expensive product near to a cheaper one
Most people won’t buy the expensive product, however, the perceived value of the cheaper product is greatly increased by contrast.

Buy one get one free
Buy one get one free offer will often encourage customers to spend more, while the same as a 50% off sale in terms of sale value, each sale is equivalent to two sales of 50% off. To expand on this, buy x and get a free y is another good way to encourage a customer to pay full price on product ‘x’. Product Y in this case if often a much cheaper item for when buy one get one free isn’t feasible.

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